Tag Archives: bs

Something is wrong in Korean organizations

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Bee awhile. Sorry for not being around. But then, I usually write something when I am unhappy with something and I have no outlet for venting. So me being away was a good thing. Now that I am writing this, you bet there is something bad.

I’ve been pretty happy with my job as a legal editor at a patent firm. Unlike most Korean workplaces, they don’t pick on me for petty things, and as long as you don’t screw up, you are left alone. It’s not a lot of payment, but it pays bills and I have very little overtime works. Then this happened: out of blue, my boss called me for a one-on-one meeting and as you can guess, I almost shit myself, thinking “OMFG did I screw something up?”

It turns out, according to my boss, there has been some complaints about my editing. Ok, acceptable. It’s something that frequently happens when you work.

Me: Oh, ok. Um…could you be more specific? Like is it more of general emails or legal/formal documents?
Boss: Uh, bit of everthing.

That doesn’t help.

Me: Ok…do you suggest anything I can do differently to amend this situation?

She was so ambiguous so I don’t know. I don’t even know why she brought this up if she doesn’t really have any suggestion. So, like a good Korean employee, I simply said “ok, um, I’ll give some thoughts on what I can do differently,” when in fact I was thinking “how the hell I can change the situation if you don’t tell me what you want?” It was sort of hinted that some people are unhappy how they have to re-review my edit, but IMO that’s ridiculous – if you had a third person review your document, of course you have to review it as well.

Then a week later, another senior manager called me up for a meeting. She started to ask about my usual workloads, out of blue. I just answered the best I can. Basically, the company got a load of works and they wanted me to manage the client communciations on the top of doing my usual review work. NO. NO NO NO NO. I’ve been there before, and I know a plenty of nightmare stories. In the end, you have to do what your boss/employer tells you to do. It’s never a winning game for you because of an imbalance of firepowers. Your work increases, but your compensation is little to none. Of course you start to make more mistakes here and there because you just don’t have enough mental space to give sufficient care to differnet balls you are juggling (and some of the balls are alien to you). Then your employer/boss starts complaining about your mistakes, and simply makes you an incapable employee – you get all the faults, and the employer/boss saves his face. How convenient. I wish I can do that to.

Since this is Korea, I mildly protested. To this senior manager, I just said “uh…let me think about it,” but we both knew it means nothing. Then to my boss, I said:

– If it’s me completely changing my duty from one thing to another thing, that’s acceptable.
– If it’s me helping a part of others’ task from time to time (which I have been doing gladly), that’s acceptable.
– But if I am to do my current work at full force and also do another work at full force, it will not go well. I can’t give you my best result and others will be negatively affected. Then usually, the person burdened with two tasks will have more work but underappreciated. I’ve been there (and many others did, too) and I don’t want to go through it again.

My boss’s answer? Well, you know, “oh I understand…but this is a learning opportunity…” NO I DON’T WANT A “LEARNING OPPORTUNITY.” If you really want someone to learn something, you need to cut out some time and space for the training, and pay for the person’s training.

In the end, I had to do the new task, while still doing my review work at 100%. *smh* Making things worse, I had to start the new task right before the Chuseok (lunar thanksgiving). Before and after holiday is the busiest time for all offices. The new task itself wasn’t a difficult job per se, but it had an awful lot of things that I have to keep tracking. Try working with several new tasks you are unfamiliar with, while you are swamped with your original duty and your computer keeps having errors. My soul was slipping away.

At the end of the day, that senior manager called me for a meeting. She said she doesn’t think I am suitable for the new task and she can tell based on her years of experience. Usually, I would say this is bs because it has been only two days and I wasn’t in a situation where I can focus on a new task. I would have tried to prove that they are wrong. But in times like this, that words were Angels singing from the heaven. Consequently, she said she will just assign a part of her job from time to time…which is what I initially suggested and they did not listen for f**ks sake.

In addition, I ended up knowing some backstories and gossips that I really didn’t want/have to do since the senior manager is a judgmental person who talks too much without thinking (I’ll probably write a separate post about it). So I sort of figured out what the work complaint I mentioned earlier was about. It seems like that a certain person high in the command (maybe more than one?) complained about my work, comparing me to someone who was working here years ago, doing something similar with my job. That someone had 10+ years of experience in this field, so he knew how the document should be written and what should be aimed without any explanation.

If I may say in a figurative way: the job posting says, “Wanted: guitarist with some experience.” So I applied and was employed. Then, someone complains, saying “she doesn’t play that well, not as well as Eric Clapton.” Well, then you probably should have figured out what you want and announce it. Or, train your guitarist.

But none of them will happen in a Korean company.

Instead, I was required to play piano as well: “oh hey, I know you are a guitarist, but now we want you to play piano as well. Oh? You’ve never played piano before? Oh well (shrug).”

This is not my first time working in a Korean company. If someone asks, I would say these are the prevalent problems in Korean companies: lack of organization, strict hierarchy, unreasonable expectation, “I don’t know what I want, so you figure out and I’ll blame everything on you.”

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